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Speaker Profile: Pierre Hammond & Andy van Houtte

Pierre Hammond & Andy Van Houtte will be presenting at Changing Perceptions 2019! Andy Van Houtte is the WPMA Design Guide Manager and also the Structural Manager at CGW Consulting Engineers, providing professional engineering services to clients in Australasia. His responsibilities include, overseeing the structural engineering team, mentoring staff, business development and assisting with the continuous improvement. Prior to this …

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Delta proposes mass timber skyscraper in B.C.

Delta Land Development is planning to skip the small steps and surge the building industry forward with a giant leap. Delta and its team is in the process of planning the world’s tallest mass timber building in Vancouver’s Broadway Corridor. Delta’s site is currently occupied by a four-storey concrete building from the 1970s that was formerly the processing centre for …

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Hickok Cole designs timber towers for Philadelphia

The Timber Towers Project seeks to demonstrate the viability of a mass timber high-rise. There are so many real timber towers on the boards or being built that one can ignore the speculative ones, but Sean McTaggart and his team at Hickok Cole Architects have designed an interesting one for Philadelphia, and tells TreeHugger that “Simply put, our mission is …

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Timber building is on the rise but is there enough and is it safe?

The use of cross laminated timber (CLT) and other engineered timber products is on the rise around the world but struggling with low awareness levels and concerns about fire risk and toxicity. Now the industry is fighting back. Last year in the wake of the Grenfell fire disaster the UK government banned combustible materials from the walls of residential high-rise …

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How cross-laminated timber could change how Australian homes are built

The way Australian homes are built could be changed forever, with new research into a type of engineered timber showing it could cement its place as an environmentally friendly alternative to concrete. Australian cross-laminated timber, or CLT, can replace concrete in many situations, including being used as a foundation for a house. Studies have already been conducted on European CLT, which …

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Speaker Profile: Ralph Austin

Ralph Austin – President of Seagate Mass Timber, Vancouver BC. When my dad had me work alongside him so he could teach me about carpentry, I was like most kids. I wanted to do something different. But after a few years of university in London, Ontario, I headed west to Alberta in the late 70s to work in the construction …

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Cross-Laminated Timber: The Sustainable Choice of Microsoft Silicon Valley

In the face of global climate change, construction and real estate professionals are increasingly seeking ways to build and operate buildings more sustainably. The most obvious of these is reducing operational carbon: that is, the carbon emitted to run the building. That’s important—and it’s something the industry has made dramatic improvements in by both increasing energy efficiency with things like …

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The Evolution of CLT

Since the new Building Regulations came into force on 21 December 2018 [in the UK], much has been written about the use of cross laminated timber (CLT), with some commentators trying to whip up a storm. Others have taken a more pragmatic approach. Andy Goodwin, Managing Director, B&K Structures, explains how they have taken an innovative approach to embrace the …

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Australia’s tallest timber building to top-up Melbourne Central

Diversified property major GPT Group will build Australia’s largest timber building, a premium 12-level office tower, on top of the Melbourne Central shopping mall, which itself sits above a metro tunnel train station. The new wood and glass tower – called Frame – designed by ARM Architecture will be made of cross laminated timber, a lightweight factory manufactured material used …

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Buildings Can Be Designed to Withstand Earthquakes.

When the shaking started at 5:46 a.m., Yasuhisa Itakura, an architect at a big Japanese construction company in Kobe, was sitting at his desk finishing a report he had toiled over all night. His office swayed, but the books stayed on their shelves and nothing fell off his desk. “I thought to myself, this earthquake is not that big,” Mr. …